• The Dalkey Archive

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    Flann O’Brien’s third novel, ‘The Dalkey Archive’ is a riotous depiction of the extraordinary events surrounding theologian and mad scientist De Selby’s attempt to destroy the world by removing all the oxygen from the atmosphere. Only Michael Shaughnessy, ‘a lowly civil servant’, and James Joyce, alive and well and working as a barman in the nearby seaside resort of Skerries, can stop the inimitable De Selby in his tracks.

  • Sexus

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    ‘I was approaching my thirty-third year, the age Christ was crucified. A wholly new life lay before me, had I the courage to risk all.’ When Henry Miller left America for Paris in the 1930s to lead the life of a literary bohemian, he called this death of his former existence and his resurrection as a writer a ‘rosy crucifixion’. This dramatic transformation provided the leitmotif for some of Miller’s finest writing, embodying everything he felt about self-liberation and the true life of the spirit. ‘Sexus’, the first volume in the ‘Rosy Crucifixion’ trilogy, looks back in fictionalised form to Miller’s America life in the 1920s. Frantically seeking antidotes to his dreary job and life ‘in a morbidly respectable neighbourhood’ with his wife Maude, Miller becomes obsessed with the promiscuous and mysterious Mara, dance hall hostess, femme fatale and pathological liar. First published in Paris in 1949, this picaresque, extraordinarily candid tale of Miller’s sexual escapades amongst the low-life of Brooklyn was banned in Great Britain and America for nearly twenty years.

  • The Third Policeman

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    A thriller, a hilarious comic satire about an archetypal village police force, a surrealistic vision of eternity, the story of a tender, brief, unrequited love affair between a man and his bicycle, and a chilling fable of unending guilt, ‘The Third Policeman’ is comparable only to ‘Alice in Wonderland’ as an allegory of the absurd. Distinguished by endless comic invention and its delicate balancing of logic and fantasy, ‘The Third Policeman’ is unique in the English language.

  • The Stone Book Quartet

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    Through four interconnected fables of a way of living in rural England that has now disappeared, Alan Garner vividly brings to life a landscape situated on the outskirts of industrial Manchester. Smiths and chandlers, steeplejacks and quarrymen, labourers and artisans all live and work hand in hand with the seasons, the elements, and the land. There is a mutual respect and a knowledge of the magical here that has somehow, somewhere been lost to us. These fables beautifully recapture and restore that lost world in simple, searching prose.

  • The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists tells the story of a group of working men who are joined one day by Owen, a journeyman-prophet with a vision of a just society. Owen’s spirited attacks on the greed and dishonesty of the capitalist system rouse his fellow men from their political quietism. A masterpiece of wit and political passion, this is one of the most authentic novels of English working class life ever written. This enduring favourite is now reinvigorated by a smart new jacket and exclusive extra material as part of Harper Perennial’s Modern Classics line of reissues. Now its timeless message of justice, equality and reason will be introduced to a whole new generation of discerning readers.

  • Nexus

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    ‘Goodbye, dear Pocohantas! Goodbye, P.T. Barnum! Goodbye, Street of Early Sorrows and may I never set eyes on you again!’ When Henry Miller left America for Paris in the 1930s to lead the life of a literary bohemian, he called this death of his former existence and his resurrection as a writer a ‘rosy crucifixion’. This dramatic transformation provided the leitmotif for some of Miller’s finest writing, embodying everything he felt about self-liberation and the true life of the spirit. ‘Nexus’, the final volume in the ‘Rosy Crucifixion’ trilogy, is a fictionalised account of his last, tempestuous few months in New York. Trapped in a bizarre ménage à trois with his volatile actress wife, Mona, and her eccentric lover, Stasia, Miller’s life descends into violent and passionate anarchy. Demoralised, exhausted and finally abandoned by the cunning and disloyal Mona, he sails for Paris.

  • Papillon

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    Condemned for a murder he had not committed, Henri Charrière (nicknamed Papillon) was sent to the penal colony of French Guiana. Forty-two days after his arrival he made his first break, travelling a thousand gruelling miles in an open boat. Recaptured, he went into solitary confinement and was sent eventually to Devil’s Island, a hell-hole of disease and brutality. No one had ever escaped from this notorious prison – no one until Papillon took to the shark-infested sea supported only by a makeshift coconut-sack raft. In thirteen years he made nine daring escapes, living through many fantastic adventures while on the run – including a sojourn with South American Indians whose women Papillon found welcomely free of European restraints… Papillon is filled with tension, adventure and high excitement. It is also one of the most vivid stories of human endurance ever written. Henri Charrière died in 1973 at the age of 66.

  • Sexus (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    The extraordinarily candid tale of Miller’s sexual escapades amongst the low-life of Brooklyn, banned in Great Britain and America for nearly twenty years after its first publication in 1949.

    ‘I was approaching my thirty-third year, the age Christ was crucified. A wholly new life lay before me, had I the courage to risk all.’

    When Henry Miller left America for Paris in the 1930s to lead the life of a literary bohemian, he called this death of his former existence and his resurrection as a writer a ‘rosy crucifixion’. This dramatic transformation provided the leitmotif for some of Miller’s finest writing, embodying everything he felt about self-liberation and the true life of the spirit.

    ‘Sexus’, the first volume in the ‘Rosy Crucifixion’ trilogy, looks back in fictionalised form to Miller’s America life in the 1920s. Frantically seeking antidotes to his dreary job and life ‘in a morbidly respectable neighbourhood’ with his wife Maude, Miller becomes obsessed with the promiscuous and mysterious Mara, dance hall hostess, femme fatale and pathological liar.

    First published in Paris in 1949, this picaresque, extraordinarily candid tale of Miller’s sexual escapades amongst the low-life of Brooklyn was banned in Great Britain and America for nearly twenty years.