• Big Sur

    • Jul 19, 2014 •

    Unmistakably autobiographical, Big Sur, Kerouac’s ninth novel, was written as the ‘King of the Beats’ was approaching middle-age and reflects his struggle to come to terms with his own myth.

    The magnificent and moving story of Jack Duluoz, a man blessed by great talent and cursed with an urge towards self-destruction, Big Sur is at once Kerouac’s toughest and his most humane work.

  • Naked Lunch

    • Jul 19, 2014 •

    Welcome to Interzone…

    Say hello to Bradley the Buyer, the best narcotics agent in the business. Check yourself into the hospital where Dr Benway works – but don’t expect adrenalin if you need it (the night porter shot it up for kicks). Meet Dr ‘Fingers’ Schafer, the Lobotomy Kid, and his greatest creation, ‘The Complete American De-anxietized Man’, a marvel of invasive psychiatry who has been reduced to nothing but a spinal cord.

    Told by an Ivy League-educated narcotics addict, ‘Naked Lunch’ juxtaposes two journeys: the narrator’s physical progress from America to North Africa, via Mexico, and a terrifying descent into his own altered consciousness. In this ‘Interzone’, loosely based on Burroughs’ temporary home of Tangier, sex, drugs and murder are the most basic of commodities, and the basest desires have become completely banal.

    Provocative, influential, morbidly fascinating and mordantly funny, ‘Naked Lunch’ takes us on an exhilarating ride through the darkest recesses of the human psyche – a ride which stunned the literary world when first published in the repressed 1950s, and is still guaranteed to épater more than a few bourgeois.

    Over forty years since first publication, Burroughs scholar Barry Miles and Burroughs’ longtime editor James Grauerholz have compiled this definitive restored text, correcting numerous errors that have accumulated over the years, and incorporating all of Burroughs’ notes and accompanying essays. Most exciting of all, this edition includes an appendix of newly discovered, never before seen material – including alternate drafts from the original manuscript and letters from Burroughs’ private correspondence.

  • Plexus

    • Mar 7, 2014 •

    When Henry Miller left America for Paris in the 1930s to lead the life of a literary bohemian, he called this death of his former existence and his resurrection as a writer a ‘rosy crucifixion’. This dramatic transformation provided the leitmotif for some of Miller’s finest writing, embodying everything he felt about self-liberation and the true life of the spirit.

    ‘Plexus’, the second volume in the trilogy, tells the story of the early days of Miller’s turbulent second marriage, his impoverished life in New York and his first steps towards being a writer.

  • Tropic of Capricorn

    • Mar 7, 2014 •

    A riotous and explosive mixture of joys and frustrations, Tropic of Capricorn chronicles Miller’s early life in New York, from his repressive Brooklyn childhood spent amongst ‘a galaxy of screwballs’ to frantic, hilarious years of dead-end jobs and innumerable erotic adventures. Irreverent and ironic, Tropic of Capricorn is both a comic portrait of the irrepressible Miller himself and a scathing attack on respectable America, the very foundations of which he hoped to shatter.

    The publication of Tropic of Capricorn and its sister-volume Tropic of Cancer in Paris in the 1930s was hailed by Samuel Beckett as ‘a momentous event in the history of modern writing’. The books were subsequently banned in the UK and the USA for nearly thirty years.

  • Nexus

    • Mar 7, 2014 •

    ‘Goodbye, dear Pocohantas! Goodbye, P.T. Barnum! Goodbye, Street of Early Sorrows and may I never set eyes on you again!’

    When Henry Miller left America for Paris in the 1930s to lead the life of a literary bohemian, he called this death of his former existence and his resurrection as a writer a ‘rosy crucifixion’. This dramatic transformation provided the leitmotif for some of Miller’s finest writing, embodying everything he felt about self-liberation and the true life of the spirit.

    ‘Nexus’, the final volume in the ‘Rosy Crucifixion’ trilogy, is a fictionalised account of his last, tempestuous few months in New York. Trapped in a bizarre ménage à trois with his volatile actress wife, Mona, and her eccentric lover, Stasia, Miller’s life descends into violent and passionate anarchy. Demoralised, exhausted and finally abandoned by the cunning and disloyal Mona, he sails for Paris.

  • The Good Terrorist

    • Mar 7, 2014 •

    In a London squat a band of bourgeois revolutionaries are united by a loathing of the waste and cruelty they see around them. These maladjusted malcontents try desperately to become involved in terrorist activities far beyond their level of competence. Only Alice seems capable of organising anything. Motherly, practical and determined, she is also easily exploited by the group and ideal fodder for a more dangerous and potent cause. Eventually their naïve radical fantasies turn into a chaos of real destruction, but the aftermath is not as exciting as they had hoped. Nonetheless, while they may not have changed the world, their lives will never be the same again…

  • Tropic of Capricorn

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    A riotous and explosive mixture of joys and frustrations, Tropic of Capricorn chronicles Miller’s early life in New York, from his repressive Brooklyn childhood spent amongst ‘a galaxy of screwballs’ to frantic, hilarious years of dead-end jobs and innumerable erotic adventures. Irreverent and ironic, Tropic of Capricorn is both a comic portrait of the irrepressible Miller himself and a scathing attack on respectable America, the very foundations of which he hoped to shatter. The publication of Tropic of Capricorn and its sister-volume Tropic of Cancer in Paris in the 1930s was hailed by Samuel Beckett as ‘a momentous event in the history of modern writing’. The books were subsequently banned in the UK and the USA for nearly thirty years.

  • Tropic of Cancer

    • Dec 13, 2013 •

    A penniless and as yet unpublished writer, Henry Miller arrived in Paris in 1930. Leaving behind a disintegrating marriage and an unhappy career in America, he threw himself into the low-life of bohemian Paris with unwavering gusto. A fictional account of Miller’s adventures amongst the prostitutes and pimps, the penniless painters and writers of Montparnasse, Tropic of Cancer is an extravagant and rhapsodic hymn to a world of unrivalled eroticism and freedom. Tropic of Cancer’s 1934 publication in France was hailed by Samuel Beckett as ‘a momentous event in the history of modern writing’. The novel was subsequently banned in the UK and the USA and not released for publication for a further thirty years.