• Americanah

    • May 26, 2021 •

    ‘A delicious, important novel’ The Times

    ‘Alert, alive and gripping’ Independent

    ‘Some novels tell a great story and others make you change the way you look at the world. Americanah does both’ Guardian

    As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race. Obinze had hoped to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

    Thirteen years later, Obinze is a wealthy man in a newly democratic Nigeria, while Ifemelu has achieved success as a blogger. But after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

    Fearless, gripping, spanning three continents and numerous lives, the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning ‘Americanah’ is a richly told story of love and expectation set in today’s globalized world.

  • Nightingale

    • May 20, 2021 •

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE SUNDAY TIMES YOUNG WRITER OF THE YEAR AWARD 2020

    ‘A rollercoaster of a read with serious intent’ The Times

    A moving and masterful novel about sex, death, passion and prejudice in a sleepy village in the south of France

    Marguerite Demers is twenty-four when she leaves Paris for the sleepy southern village of Saint-Sulpice, to take up a job as a live-in nurse. Her charge is Jerome Lanvier, once one of the most powerful men in the village, and now dying alone in his large and secluded house, surrounded by rambling gardens. Manipulative and tyrannical, Jerome has scared away all his previous nurses.

    It’s not long before the villagers have formed opinions of Marguerite. Brigitte Brochon, pillar of the community and local busybody, finds her arrogant and mysterious and is desperate to find a reason to have her fired. Glamorous outsider Suki Lacourse sees Marguerite as an ally in a sea of small-minded provincialism. Local farmer Henri Brochon, husband of Brigitte, feels concern for her and wants to protect her from the villagers’ intrusive gossip and speculation – but Henri has a secret of his own that would intrigue and disturb his neighbours just as much as the truth about Marguerite, if only they knew …

    Set among the lush fields and quiet olive groves of southern France, and written in clear prose of crystalline beauty, Nightingale is a masterful, moving novel about death, sexuality, compassion, prejudice and freedom.

  • Who They Was

    • May 20, 2021 •

    Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2020

    A Spectator Book of the Year

    ‘A literary rendering of the Top Boy generation… I cannot conjure another work which captures this culture in such depth – or with such brutal honesty – as only lived experience can tell ’ Graeme Armstrong, author of The Young Team

    ’An astonishingly powerful book’ Cathy Rentzenbrink, author of The Last Act of Love

    This life is like being in an ocean. Some people keep swimming towards the bottom. Some people touch the bottom with one foot, or even both, and then push themselves off it to get back up to the top, where you can breathe. Others get to the bottom and decide they want to stay there. I don’t want to get to the bottom because I’m already drowning.

    This is a story of a London you won’t find in any guidebooks.

    This is a story about what it’s like to exist in the moment, about boys too eager to become men, growing up in the hidden war zones of big cities – and the girls trying to make it their own way.

    This is a story of reputations made and lost, of violence and vengeance – and never counting the cost.

    This is a story of concrete towers and blank eyed windows, of endless nights in police stations and prison cells, of brotherhood and betrayal.

    This is about the boredom, the rush, the despair, the fear and the hope.

    This is about what’s left behind.

  • The Mirror and the Light (The Wolf Hall Trilogy)

    • May 20, 2021 •

    The Sunday Times bestselling sequel to Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, the stunning conclusion to Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall trilogy.

    A Guardian Book of the Year • A Times Book of the Year • A Daily Telegraph Book of the Year • A Sunday Times Book of the Year • A New Statesman Book of the Year • A Spectator Book of the Year

    Shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2020
    Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2020

    ‘Mantel has taken us to the dark heart of history…and what a show’ The Times

    ‘If you cannot speak truth at a beheading, when can you speak it?’

    England, May 1536. Anne Boleyn is dead, decapitated in the space of a heartbeat by a hired French executioner. As her remains are bundled into oblivion, Thomas Cromwell breakfasts with the victors. The blacksmith’s son from Putney emerges from the spring’s bloodbath to continue his climb to power and wealth, while his formidable master, Henry VIII, settles to short-lived happiness with his third queen, Jane Seymour.

    Cromwell is a man with only his wits to rely on; he has no great family to back him, no private army. Despite rebellion at home, traitors plotting abroad and the threat of invasion testing Henry’s regime to breaking point, Cromwell’s robust imagination sees a new country in the mirror of the future. But can a nation, or a person, shed the past like a skin? Do the dead continually unbury themselves? What will you do, the Spanish ambassador asks Cromwell, when the king turns on you, as sooner or later he turns on everyone close to him?

    With The Mirror and the Light, Hilary Mantel brings to a triumphant close the trilogy she began with Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies. She traces the final years of Thomas Cromwell, the boy from nowhere who climbs to the heights of power, offering a defining portrait of predator and prey, of a ferocious contest between present and past, between royal will and a common man’s vision: of a modern nation making itself through conflict, passion and courage.

    Sunday Times Bestseller (08/03/2020)

  • I Wish I Knew This Earlier

    • May 20, 2021 •

    Relationships can be tricky and break-ups can be devastating. Many of us learn lessons in hindsight, but this often comes with making some mistakes. In this book, speaker and writer Toni Tone shares brilliant advice and illumining wisdom to help you avoid these mistakes and improve the way you navigate dating, love, and heartbreak.

    A few years before writing this book, Toni walked away from a long-term relationship. When this relationship broke down – and as many of us will know – it encouraged Toni to go through a huge range of challenging emotions, and reflect on all her past relationship experiences – including what shaped her, what she learned from others, things she did well and things she could have done differently. 
     
    This experience ended up being the best thing that could have happened to her. It led her to learn more about herself than ever before and allowed her to navigate relationships more effectively going forward. Most crucially, it changed her outlook on life and she channelled this energy into her creativity by helping people understand their worth and avoid common relationship mistakes. 
     
    I Wish I Knew This Earlier is the perfect gift – the ideal handbook told in Toni’s distinctively relatable and thoughtful style, that will speak to anyone who has ever struggled through dating, experienced love, and been through (or is going through) heartbreak.

  • How To Talk To Robots: A Girls’ Guide To a Future Dominated by AI

    • May 20, 2021 •

    ’…an essential and fascinating manual for every woman who wants to understand equality within an ever-changing, modern world.’ Scarlett Curtis

    ‘…[this book] taught me more than any book has ever taught me about AI.’ Chris Evans, Virgin Radio

    How To Talk To Robots, is your girls guide to Artificial Intelligence. Entrepreneur Tabitha Goldstaub welcomes you into the AI world with a warm embrace. She brilliantly breaks down the tech-bro barriers offering a straightforward introduction and makes clear the enormous benefits of understanding AI..

    If your social feed defines your spending habits or you’ve downloaded the latest filter to see what you’ll look like when you are old or now connect with your doctor using an app, have applied for a job online or used your phone to arrive at work in record time, AI is playing a part in how you live, work and play. We live in an era where machines are taught to learn and act without human intervention and there are infinite possibilities to their applications. The risk of these technologies biasing against you is real, and this book will give you tools to navigate the current and future developments consciously.

    As well as explaining the risks Tabitha lays out the awesome benefits AI can offer. From spotting disease to tailoring education and tackling climate change the potential rewards are life-changing.

    Starting with a potted history, Tabitha shines a light on the many unsung heroines since the rise of AI in the 1960s. In conversation with Karen Hao she simply demonstrates how the technology works (and sometimes doesn’t work!) and interviews a cross-section of women who use AI in their work today including Jeanette Winterson, Sharmadean Reid, Martha Lane Fox and Hannah Fry. This book doesn’t just present the challenge; Tabitha offers supportive practical advice and shares an extensive list of books, films, courses and more for further exploration.

    However it is that you identify with womanhood, wherever you are in life, and whatever you do, this technology is inescapable and now is your time to make sure AI works for you – and not you for it!

  • Conjure Women

    • May 20, 2021 •

    A Stylist Best Book of 2020

    You’re free to decide your future. But how do you escape the ghosts of the past?

    A stunning debut novel with echoes of Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing and Sara Collins’ The Confessions of Frannie Langton

    The pale-skinned, black-eyed baby is a bad omen. That’s one thing the people on the old plantation are sure of. The other is that Miss Rue – midwife, healer, crafter of curses – will know what to do.

    But for once Rue doesn’t know. Times have changed since her mother Miss May Belle held the power to influence the life and death of her fellow slaves. Freedom has come. The master’s Big House lies in ruins. But this new world brings new dangers, and Rue’s old magic may be no match for them.

    When sickness sweeps across her tight-knit community, Rue finds herself the focus of suspicion. What secrets does she keep amidst the charred remains of the Big House? Which spells has she conjured to threaten their children? And why is she so wary of the charismatic preacher man who promises to save them all?

    Rue understands fear. It has shaped her life and her mother’s before her. And now she knows she must face her fears – and her ghosts – to find a new way forward for herself and her people.

    Conjure Women is a story of the lengths we’ll go to save the ones we love, from a stunning new voice in fiction.

  • Year of Wonders (Collins Modern Classics)

    • May 20, 2021 •

    Introducing the Collins Modern Classics, a series featuring some of the most significant books of recent times, books that shed light on the human experience – classics which will endure for generations to come.

    In the spring of 1666, a bolt of infected cloth carries the plague from London to the quiet village of Eyam. The villagers elect to isolate themselves in a fateful quarantine, seen through the eyes of eighteen-year-old Anna Frith. As death and superstition creep from household to household, she must confront loss and the lure of illicit love in an extraordinary Year of Wonders.

    This timeless and powerful novel, based on a true story, was the astonishing debut novel from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of March.