We Need to Talk About Money

Otegha Uwagba

‘One of the most original and talented young writers we have.’ Sathnam Sanghera

‘A must-read.’ Elizabeth Day

‘A beautiful, searingly personal account of a world defined by money, full of courage and truth telling.’ Owen Jones

An extraordinarily candid personal account of the ups and downs wrought by money, We Need To Talk About Money is a vital exploration of stories and issues that will be familiar to most. This is a book about toxic workplaces and misogynist men, about getting payrises and getting evicted. About class and privilege and racism and beauty. About shame and pride, compulsion and fear.

In unpicking the shroud of secrecy surrounding money – who has it, how they got it, and how it shapes our lives – this boldly honest account of one woman’s journey upturns countless social conventions, and uncovers some startling truths about our complex relationships with money in the process.

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Reviews of We Need to Talk About Money

    • Praise for We Need To Talk About Money:
    • ‘A beautiful, searingly personal account of a world defined by money, full of courage and truth telling.’ Owen Jones
    • ‘In this compelling book, Otegha confronts the British aversion to discussing money and in doing so reveals she is one of the most original and talented young writers we have.’ Sathnam Sanghera
    • ‘A brilliant book that moved, amused, challenged and made me re-evaluate my own relationship with money. Otegha Uwagba writes with real intelligence and insight about the things many of us suspect but leave unsaid. A must-read.’ Elizabeth Day
    • ‘This brilliant book has made me re-evaluate my money privileges, past and present. A must-read for anyone who thinks their money is just their monthly cash flow.’ Raven Smith
    • ‘A riveting, confronting memoir – as beautifully written as it is provocative and thoughtful.’ Pandora Sykes
    • ‘Refreshingly honest – Otegha captures the creeping realisation in your twenties that your feelings about what you earn defines so much, from self-image to who we date, who we are friends with to what we will – or won’t – put up with at the office.’ Laura Whateley
    • ‘Personal but universal, Uwagba’s story of navigating university and the world of work while dealing with the pressures of class, lack of privilege and misogyny, is illuminating, eye-opening and reassuring.’ The Bookseller
    • Praise for Whites:
    • ‘An eloquent, heartfelt mini-memoir. Otegha Uwagba examines the subtle ways in which fighting racism is hampered not only by those who are obviously racist, but more perniciously by those who believe themselves to be anti-racist.’ Angela Saini
    • ‘Clear-sighted, compelling and very, very necessary.’ Michael Donkor