Foxlowe

Foxlowe

Eleanor Wasserberg

A compulsive and chilling debut about a girl growing up in a cult

WHY WOULD ANYONE WANT TO LEAVE?

Green and Blue are sisters.

Foxlowe is home. Outside is Bad.

Green understands.

Why can’t Blue?

‘Will lure you in – then cut to the kill’ Guardian

‘Wonderfully tense’ Emerald Street

‘To read Foxlowe is not unlike wandering through Foxlowe itself on some long night: I felt never quite certain where the corridors might take me, nor whom I might meet on turning a corner; and in the final moments I found myself hurtling down a flight of steps into the darkSarah Perry, author of The Essex Serpent

‘The ending is like a punch to the throat’ The i

Reviews of Foxlowe

    • ‘This fable will lure you in – then cut to the kill’ Sarah Perry, Guardian
    • ‘Meticulously conceived and darkly compelling. Underpinning the claustrophobic horror is a parable of unchecked sibling rivalry, a girl’s desperate need for motherly love and the knotted consequences of childhood trauma’ Observer
    • ‘A richly atmospheric Gothic debut . . . meticulous, intimate and compelling. Foxlowe may give up its secrets, in the end, but it never gives up its hold’ Irish Times
    • ‘An accomplished debut . . . the ending [is] like a punch to the throat’ Independent
    • ‘Unsettling and persuasive, impressively well executed and, at the last, utterly disturbing. I’m still flinching away from thinking about the final scene’ Alison Flood, Lovereading
    • ‘Mesmerising, gripping and beautifully written. It completely sweeps you up from beginning to end. I loved it’ Kate Hamer, author of The Girl in the Red Coat
    • ‘Wasserberg has a strong and distinctive voice and this is an excellent debut’ Clare Mackintosh, author of I Let You Go
    • ‘An extraordinary, astonishing story of a girl’s longing for motherly love. Beautifully harrowing, and powerfully haunting, it is the most heartbreaking tale I have read this year’ Liz Nugent, author of Unravelling Oliver
    • ‘I thoroughly enjoyed this vivid and claustrophobic coming-of-age debut’ Tasha Kavanagh, author of Things We Have in Common
    • ‘Dissonant, haunting and superbly atmospheric. An immensely subtle and profoundly affecting debut’ Paraic O’Donnell, author of The Maker of Swans