• The Woman Destroyed (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

    • Aug 4, 2018 •

    First published in 1967, this book consists of three short novellas on the theme of women’s vulnerability – in the first, to the process of ageing, in the second to loneliness, and, in the third, to the growing indifference of a loved one.

    THE WOMAN DESTROYED is a collection of three stories, each an exquisite and passionate study of a woman trapped by circumstances, trying to rebuild her life.

    In the first story, ‘The Age of Discretion’, a successful scholar fast approaching middle age faces a double shock – her son’s abandonment of the career she has chosen for him and the harsh critical rejection of her latest academic work. ‘The Monologue’ is an extraordinary New Year’s Eve outpouring of invective from a woman consumed with bitterness and loneliness after her son and her husband have left home. Finally, in ‘The Woman Destroyed’, Simone de Beauvoir tells the story of Monique, trying desperately to resurrect her life after her husband confesses to an affair with a younger woman.

    Compassionate, lucid, full of wit and knowing, Simone de Beauvoir’s rare insight into the inequalities and complexities of women’s lives is unsurpassable.

  • She Came to Stay (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

    • Aug 4, 2018 •

    Written as an act of revenge against the 17 year-old who came between her and Jean-Paul Sartre, She Came to Stay is Simone de Beauvoir’s first novel – a lacerating study of a young, naive couple in love and the usurping woman who comes between them.

    ‘It is impossible to talk about faithfulness and unfaithfulness where we are concerned. You and I are simply one. Neither of us can be described without the other.’

    It was unthinkable that Pierre and Francoise should ever tire of each other. And yet, both talented and restless, they constantly feel the need for new sensations, new people. Because of this they bring the young, beautiful and irresponsible Xavière into their life who, determined to take Pierre for herself, drives a wedge between them, with unforeseeable, disastrous consequences…

    Published in 1943, ‘She Came to Stay’ is Simone de Beauvoir’s first novel. Written as an act of revenge against the woman who nearly destroyed her now legendary, unorthodox relationship with the philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, it fictionalises the events of 1935, when Sartre became infatuated with seventeen-year old Olga Bost, a pupil and devotee of de Beauvoir’s.

    Passionately eloquent, coolly and devastatingly ironic, ‘She Came to Stay’ is one of the most extraordinary and powerful pieces of fictional autobiography of the twentieth century, in which de Beauvoir’s ‘tears for her characters freeze as they drop.’

  • The Dalkey Archive (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

    • Apr 20, 2016 •

    From the author of the classic novel ‘At-Swim-Two-Birds’ comes this ingenious tale which follows the mad and absurd ambitions of a scientist determined to destroy the world.

    Flann O’Brien’s third novel, ‘The Dalkey Archive’ is a riotous depiction of the extraordinary events surrounding theologian and mad scientist De Selby’s attempt to destroy the world by removing all the oxygen from the atmosphere. Only Michael Shaughnessy, ‘a lowly civil servant’, and James Joyce, alive and well and working as a barman in the nearby seaside resort of Skerries, can stop the inimitable De Selby in his tracks.

  • Best of Myles (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

    • Apr 20, 2016 •

    Under the pseudonym Myles na Gopaleen, Flann O’ Brien wrote a daily column in the ‘Irish Times’ called ‘Cruiskeen Lawn’ for over twenty years which hilariously satirised the absurdities and solemnities of Dublin life.

    With shameless irony and relentless high spirits Myles’ ‘Cruiskeen Lawn’ became the most feared, respected and uproarious newspaper column in the whole of Ireland from its first appearance in 1940 until his death in 1966.

    This wonderful selection from the ‘Cruiskeen Lawn’ columns is a modern classic that will appeal to lovers of absurdity and sharp comic observation everywhere.

  • Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    • Sep 14, 2014 •

    Hunter S. Thompson is roaring down the desert highway to Las Vegas with his attorney, the Samoan, to find the dark side of the American Dream. Armed with a drug arsenal of stupendous proportions, the duo engage in a surreal succession of chemically enhanced confrontations with casino operators, police officers and assorted Middle Americans.

    This ebook edition of Hunter S. Thompson’s iconic masterpiece, a controversial bestseller when it appeared in 1971, features the brilliant Ralph Steadman illustrations of the original. It brings to a new generation the hallucinatory humour and nightmare terror of Hunter S. Thompson’s musings on the collapse of the American Dream.

  • Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72

    • Sep 14, 2014 •

    In 1972 Hunter S. Thompson, the creator and king of Gonzo journalism, covered the US presidential campaign for Rolling Stone magazine alongside the establishment newsmen of Washington. The result is a classic piece of subversive reportage and a fantastic ride on the rollercoaster of Hunter’s uniquely savage imagination. In his own words, written years before Watergate: ‘It is Nixon himself who represents that dark, venal and incurably violent side of the American character almost every other country in the world has learned to fear and despise.’

  • The Colour of Blood

    • Jul 19, 2014 •

    Somewhere in an unnamed Eastern bloc country, someone is out to silence Cardinal Bem. Is it the Secret Police, or is it – more shockingly – fanatical Catholic activists who believe that Bem, by keeping the peace between Church and State, has finally compromised himself too far? Narrowly escaping an assassination attempt, Bem is abducted by sinister, anonymous men, and spirited away to a ‘safe house’ against his will. Evading his unknown captors, he is faced with a horrifying proposition: no longer sure of whom he can trust, Bem realises that he alone can avert the revolution which threatens to tear his country apart…

  • Doctor Sax

    • Jul 19, 2014 •

    Of all his books, Doctor Sax was the one Jack Kerouac loved the most. He began writing it in 1948, but wrote the greater part of it in 1952, when he was staying in Mexico with William Burroughs.

    Told through the character of Kerouac’s fictional alter ego, Jack Duluoz, the novel tells the story of his extraordinary childhood in Massachusetts. A clever and rebellious boy, playing among the river weeds and railroad tracks, going to the movies, reading pulp comics and watching cartoons, Jack creates an imaginary world of strange, new possibilities. Within this world lies the weird and wonderful Doctor Sax…