Archive for the ‘Bame Prize’ Category

  • Deep Heart by Kandace Siobhan Walker

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    We are always barefoot. I try to explain this to the police officers who arrive from the mainland. We’re quieter this way and we need to be quiet when we’re stalking wild animals in the pine forest. Heaven walks in front because she’s the oldest, then me because I’m the youngest, then Bluebird at the rear. When I tell the black policeman we were hunting, Heaven shakes her head. She tells him we were at home. He looks at me, then her, then back at me. We’re sitting at the kitchen table, the soles of our feet muddy and bleeding. Well, says the officer, which one is it?

    Read more…
  • Packed Lunch by Jenna Mahale

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    MISE EN PLACE:
    the preparation of dishes and ingredients before the beginning of service

    Though he might not like to admit it, my dad has always been good with food. He has a talent for improvising kitchen cupboard scraps into a meal, transforming stale bread and old sun-dried tomatoes into delicious bruschetta, or producing delicate crudités from vegetable drawer remnants. He has an innate sense of what flavours pair well together, and an ability to plate things in the artful way they do in restaurants. He often denies this gift, brushing off compliments by saying he can only make snack-food, which is really just his way of saying he doesn’t want to cook for the household.

    Read more…
  • 50 Rose Tower by Oluchi Ezeh

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    The summer before our family fell apart, a legend started on our estate. I was ten at the time, and like every other ten year old, all I wanted to do was spend summer riding around on my bike at the park near our house. The climbing frames in the park were rusty and completely discoloured – unless whoever built them had intended brown to be the colour of childhood excitement – so it didn’t appeal to many parents as an afterschool site. Also, I’m pretty sure that drug dealers used to hang out there but I never met any, so how much of a presence could they have been really, you know?

    Read more…
  • The Cat by The Incredible Jimmy Smith by Sonia Hope

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    1964: the year his marriage ended. The year his record stopped spinning, the needle in his groove lifted haltingly, and with a snap returned his tone arm to its cradle.

    Read more…
  • Once we were Warriors by Jameen Kaur

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    ‘Check the time and date properly on the ticket. I don’t want us getting a fine. I’m still paying off your brother’s overdraft,’ said Mum, as she pulled herself out of the car.

    Read more…
  • The Hyacinth Girls by Arenike Adebajo

    • Sep 9, 2019 •

    The rainy season brought rumours. Whispers of poison after a mass recall of Indomie noodles. A girl in Form 3 reappearing after several months with family in Maryland, withdrawn. Lurid headlines warned of cults, front pages daubed with blurry corpses. There were mutterings that the pastor of the Shining Light Ministry had not succumbed to a brief illness as had been announced to his congregation. Suicide. A word breathed into neighbours’ ears along pews. They said the body would never have been found if the hyacinth had not bloomed so late.

    Read more…
  • BAME Prize 2018 Stories

    • Sep 13, 2018 •

    We are thrilled to announce that the winner of the Guardian 4th Estate BAME Short Story Prize 2018 is Yiming Ma for his story, Swimmer of Yangtze

    Read more…

  • BAME Prize 2018: Swimmer of Yangtze by Yiming Ma

    • Sep 13, 2018 •

     

    The boy had been born with four healthy limbs but by the end of his first year, he had already lost both his arms. Broad, toned shoulders gave him the triangular physique that so many young men craved, as if his upper body were perfectly fitted for a Zhongshan tunic suit – although if he were actually to have worn one, his father would have needed to trim both sleeves off so as to draw less attention to his son’s missing limbs beneath blue and black cloth.

    Read more…