The Corrections

Jonathan Franzen

The Lamberts – Enid and Alfred and their three grown-up children – are a troubled family living in a troubled age. Alfred is ill and as his condition worsens the whole family must face the failures, secrets and long-buried hurts that haunt them if they are to make the corrections that each desperately needs. Stretching from the Midwest in the mid-century to Wall Street and Eastern Europe in the age of globalised greed, The Corrections brings an old-time America of freight trains and civic duty into wild collision with the era of home surveillance, hands-off parenting, do-it-yourself mental healthcare, and New Economy millionaires. It announces Jonathan Franzen as one of the most brilliant interpreters of American society and the American soul.

Reviews of The Corrections

  • ‘Jonathan Franzen has built a powerful novel out of the swarming consciousness of a marriage, a family, a whole culture – our culture. And he has done it with a sympathy and expansiveness that bends the edgy modern temper to a generous breadth of vision.’ Don DeLillo

    ‘Funny and deeply sad, large-hearted and merciless, The Corrections is a testament to the range and depth of pleasures great fiction affords.’
    David Foster Wallace

    ‘In its complexity, its scrutinizing and utterly unsentimental humanity, and its grasp of the subtle relationships between domestic drama and global events, The Corrections stands in the company of Mann’s Buddenbrooks and DeLillo’s White Noise. It is a major accomplishment.’ Michael Cunningham

    ‘A book which is funny, moving, generous, brutal and intelligent, and which poses the ultimate question: what life is for? And that is as much as anyone could ask.’ Blake Morrison, Guardian

    ‘For anyone who has ever found themselves guiltily yearning for an Anne Tyler while in the middle of an Updike or Wolfe. The Lamberts are utterly believable, and once they have all told their stories you can’t help but sympathise with them. Be prepared to be moved.’ Laurence Phelan, Independent on Sunday

    ‘Compelling. A pleasure from beginning to end. Franzen, in one leap, has put himself into the league of Updike and Roth.’ David Sexton, Evening Standard

    ‘A novel of outstanding sympathy, wit, moral intelligence and pathos, a family saga told with stylistic brio and psychological and political insight. No British novelist is currently writing at this pitch.’ Jeremy Treglowen, Financial Times