Blog

  • Angela Saini / Greenfeast

    • Oct 23, 2019 •

    In celebration of Nigel Slater’s Greenfeast: autumn, winter publishing this October, we asked some 4th Estate authors to write a few words about veg-minded living.

    Angela Saini, author of Inferior and Superior:

    “My parents moved home a lot when I was young, but in the garden of one of our houses – my favourite, thinking back – was an old plum tree.

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  • Laura Whateley / Greenfeast

    • Oct 21, 2019 •

    In celebration of Nigel Slater’s Greenfeast: autumn, winter publishing this October, we asked some 4th Estate authors to write a few words about veg-minded living.

    Laura Whateley, author of Money:

    “When I decided, aged 25, to move in with my boyfriend, it was not the loss of single-girl freedom that most concerned me, nor how we would navigate our different views on “tidiness” – he’s an Essex boy with a father who was an architect, immaculate work surfaces are in his blood.

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  • Allan Jenkins / Greenfeast

    • Oct 9, 2019 •

    In celebration of Nigel Slater’s Greenfeast: autumn, winter publishing this October, we asked some 4th Estate authors to write a few words about veg-minded living.

    Allan Jenkins, author of Plot 29 and Morning:

    “Winter came close to my kitchen last week. I had been lazing in late summer, eating endless varieties of salad and baked ratatouille, made mostly with shallots and various squash from our organic allotment at the top of Hampstead. I was surrounded by sunflowers, chest-high marigolds and fragrant flowering coriander. Plot 29 was in its pomp.

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  • Deep Heart by Kandace Siobhan Walker

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    We are always barefoot. I try to explain this to the police officers who arrive from the mainland. We’re quieter this way and we need to be quiet when we’re stalking wild animals in the pine forest. Heaven walks in front because she’s the oldest, then me because I’m the youngest, then Bluebird at the rear. When I tell the black policeman we were hunting, Heaven shakes her head. She tells him we were at home. He looks at me, then her, then back at me. We’re sitting at the kitchen table, the soles of our feet muddy and bleeding. Well, says the officer, which one is it?

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  • Packed Lunch by Jenna Mahale

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    MISE EN PLACE:
    the preparation of dishes and ingredients before the beginning of service

    Though he might not like to admit it, my dad has always been good with food. He has a talent for improvising kitchen cupboard scraps into a meal, transforming stale bread and old sun-dried tomatoes into delicious bruschetta, or producing delicate crudités from vegetable drawer remnants. He has an innate sense of what flavours pair well together, and an ability to plate things in the artful way they do in restaurants. He often denies this gift, brushing off compliments by saying he can only make snack-food, which is really just his way of saying he doesn’t want to cook for the household.

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  • 50 Rose Tower by Oluchi Ezeh

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    The summer before our family fell apart, a legend started on our estate. I was ten at the time, and like every other ten year old, all I wanted to do was spend summer riding around on my bike at the park near our house. The climbing frames in the park were rusty and completely discoloured – unless whoever built them had intended brown to be the colour of childhood excitement – so it didn’t appeal to many parents as an afterschool site. Also, I’m pretty sure that drug dealers used to hang out there but I never met any, so how much of a presence could they have been really, you know?

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  • The Cat by The Incredible Jimmy Smith by Sonia Hope

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    1964: the year his marriage ended. The year his record stopped spinning, the needle in his groove lifted haltingly, and with a snap returned his tone arm to its cradle.

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  • Once we were Warriors by Jameen Kaur

    • Sep 11, 2019 •

    ‘Check the time and date properly on the ticket. I don’t want us getting a fine. I’m still paying off your brother’s overdraft,’ said Mum, as she pulled herself out of the car.

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